Utah County SQL Server User Group

Welcome to the Utah County Chapter

Next Meeting

Monday,

March

20

Practical Database Modeling

  • In-Person @ 1955 W Grove Pkwy (take exit 275) Pleasant Grove, Utah, United States (map)
  • 15:00 - 17:00 Mountain Daylight Time
  • Language: English

Creating a database model for your application may seem like an easy task – just create the tables and columns and start filling it with data, right?  But rarely it is that simple and straightforward.  The design decisions you make will determine if your database is able to accurately store and retrieve the information in your application.  You heard that right – I’ve seen data models that accurately stored data, but lost information.  Sub-optimal designs also end up being brittle, meaning they require large-scale overhauls when new features are added, and they frequently have performance issues.  You can’t create enough indexes and plan guides to cover the performance problems due to poor table design.  This session will teach you how to ask a product analyst the right questions and use the answers to build a robust data model - a key skill for any data professional, whether it’s a database administrator, database developer or database analyst.  We’ll begin by discussing the principles of normalization (and why normalization is important), and lay down a few basic rules for determining data structure.  Then we’ll whiteboard the data model for an application to see the practical application of both normalization and de-normalization.

Featured Presentation:

Practical Database Modeling

Chad Crawford, Principal Database Engineer Henry Schein Practice Solutions

Creating a database model for your application may seem like an easy task – just create the tables and columns and start filling it with data, right? But rarely it is that simple and straightforward. The design decisions you make will determine if your database is able to accurately store and retrieve the information in your application. You heard that right – I’ve seen data models that accurately stored data, but lost information. Sub-optimal designs also end up being brittle, meaning they require large-scale overhauls when new features are added, and they frequently have performance issues. You can’t create enough indexes and plan guides to cover the performance problems due to poor table design. This session will teach you how to ask a product analyst the right questions and use the answers to build a robust data model - a key skill for any data professional, whether it’s a database administrator, database developer or database analyst. We’ll begin by discussing the principles of normalization (and why normalization is important), and lay down a few basic rules for determining data structure. Then we’ll whiteboard the data model for an application to see the practical application of both normalization and de-normalization.

About Chad:
Chad Crawford is an MCM and Principal Database Engineer with 18 years' experience in database architecture, development and administration. He has worked in the manufacturing, health care and consulting industries, primarily focusing on design, performance, and high-availability of customer facing SAAS systems. He loves teaching and sharing new ideas, and created a custom training course that helped dozens of coworkers prepare for certification exams. He speaks regularly for users groups and SQL Saturday, and leads the Utah County SQL Users Group. When he isn’t optimizing a query or analyzing performance tests, you will find him running, tweaking a ham radio, or looking for a new strategy board game.

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